CEESP MEMBERS NEWS

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CEESP Member wins Nobel Memorial Prize

IUCN congratulates Professor Elinor Ostrom, a member of IUCN's Commission on Environmental, Economic and Social Policy, for winning the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences Professor Ostrom, who is involved with the theme on Governance, Equity and Rights in the Commission, shared the prize with Oliver E. Williamson, for "her analysis of economic governance, especially the commons". She is the first woman to win the prize in this category.

"We were delighted to hear about Professor Ostrom's remarkable achievement," said IUCN Director General Julia Marton-Lefèvre. "IUCN has widely used the results of her research to advance community-based natural resource management and to support governance regimes that enable improved management of common property resources."

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CEESP Member Viktor Kaisiepo Passes Away

Viktor Kaisiepo, a well known human rights activist and CEESP Member (TGER & TILCEPA) passed away on 31 January 2010.

Papuan human rights activist, Viktor Kaisiepo, passed away in his home town of Amersfoort, in the Netherlands, at the age of 61.

Kaisiepo was a spokesperson for the West Papua People's Front, which is a federation of Papuan organizations in the Netherlands.

Kaisiepo was born in Dutch New Guinea. His family left for the Netherlands when Dutch New Guinea was handed over to Indonesia in 1962.

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Rick Steiner resigns from University of Alaska

Rick Steiner, a prominent and active member of CEESP has resigned from his academic position in the wake of controversy over his outspoken views on environmental protection.

Professor Rick Steiner who, since before the Exxon Valdez disaster has been known as a critic of the oil industry and a defender of marine conservation, has resignedfrom the University of Alaska.

The university had stripped him of a NOAA grant because of his outspoken opposition to offshore oil development in the Bristol Bay region. Steiner filed a grievance and, in October lost. He then resigned. Click below to find out why. 

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CEESP NEWS & UPDATES

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Indigenous and Community Conserved Areas: A Bold New Frontier for Conservation

The ICCA Forum has a new website which includes a variety of ICCA information, analyses and reports from all over the world: www.ICCAforum.org. You are welcome to submit ICCA-relevant case studies and other insights, announcements and materials that you would like to propose for uploading.

What are Indigenous and Community Conserved Areas (ICCAs)?

ICCAs are natural and/or modified ecosystems containing significant biodiversity values, ecological services and cultural values, voluntarily conserved by Indigenous peoples and local communities, both sedentary and mobile, through customary laws or other effective means.

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Communities and bio-cultural diversity in Cambodia - options for policies and action whose time has come

Indigenous Territories and Areas conserved by Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (ICCAs in short) encompass many of the bio-cultural patrimonies of the world. However, while the Convention on Biological Diversity formally recognises them and recommends their support, recognition by national governments is often problematic.

Even governments signatory to the CBD, and thus formally compelled to recognise ICCAs, are hampered by unsuited policy and legislation, and problems related to implementation and practice.

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Mining Conflicts in Latin America 

CEESP Member Rick Steiner undertook an independent fact finding mission for CEESP on the assassination of activists protesting against the El Dorado mine in El Salvador.  His Report will be made available soon. As part of his research, the following report on the scale of mining conflicts in Latin America was provided by the Observatory of Environmental Conflicts (OCLA) and Executive Coordination Observatory for Mining Conflicts in Latin America (OCMAL).  

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Brussels Principles for Extractive Industries

CEESP SEAPRISE members Rick Steiner and Richard Cellarius promote a new paradigm for Oil & Gas Development at the European Conference on Extractive Industries, Oct. 13th, 2009.

The Brussels Principles: A New Paradigm for Oil and Gas Development highlights the following...

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"POLICY MATTERS" - Call for papers

CEESP will be producing two editions of our peer reviewed Commission publication Policy Matters during 2010. Macroeconomic Policies for Sustainable Development and Rights-Based Approaches to Conservation - Ensuring the Local Integrity of Environmental Law and Policy.

Call for papers - POLICY MATTERS: ISSUE 17 “Macroeconomic Policies for Sustainable Development”

Guest Editor: Alejandro Nadal (Co-Chair, TEMTI; Full Professor, Center for Economic Studies, El Colegio de México). This issue of Policy Matters will concentrate on the impact of macroeconomic policies on the environment and on sustainable development. Macroeconomic policies include monetary and fiscal policies, as well as exchange rate and financial market deregulation, balance of payments measures and income policies. These policies determine the strength, shape and orientation of the economic forces that affect biodiversity, soils, water resources, forests, fisheries and the atmosphere. Macroeconomic policies embody an “implicit environmental policy” that frequently contradicts the objectives of explicit environmental policies. In spite of its relevance, the relation between macroeconomic policies and sustainable development has been systematically ignored. Papers should focus on the effects of macroeconomic policies on different environmental dimensions, as well as on ways to integrate sustainability in the core objectives of macroeconomic strategies and policies.

The deadline for contributions for PM 17 is 9 April 2010.

Call for Papers - POLICY MATTERS: ISSUE 18 “Rights-based Approaches to Conservation: Ensuring the Local Integrity of Environmental Law and Policy”

Guest Editors: Kabir Bavikatte, Harry Jonas, and Holly Shrumm (Natural Justice: Lawyers for Communities and the Environment)

International laws and policies such as the UNCBD International Regime on Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS) and the UNFCCC Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries (REDD) have the potential to undermine, not uphold, the rights of indigenous peoples and local communities to maintain their customary ways of life that contribute to the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. Building on Policy Matters Issue 15 (“Conservation and Human Rights”), this issue will not only discuss recent developments in rights-based approaches to conservation, but will also push the rights-based discourse further by focusing on processes and innovations occurring around the world to ensure the local integrity of environmental law and policy.

Papers may discuss this theme within various contexts such as bio-cultural heritage, indigenous and community conserved areas, protected areas, marine, plant and animal genetic resources, desertification, climate change adaptation, ABS, and REDD. Please submit your contributions to Holly Shrumm (holly@naturaljustice.org.za) by June 4, 2010. This issue will be launched at the UNCBD Conference of Parties in October.

If you wish to submit contributions to either of these editions, please contact the relevant guest editor or ceesp@iucn.org. PM Issue 17 Guest Editor - sirius.iceberg@gmal.com PM Issue 18 Guest Editor - Holly Shrumm (holly@naturaljustice.org.za). Contributions should be consistent with the Theme, include two to four (maximum) photos or maps that you have permission to use in a printed work, and be between 1500 - 3000 words. Contributions can also take the form of Book Reviews of publications relevant to the Theme. Deadline for contributions to

PM Issue 17 is 9 April 2010, and PM Issue 18 is 4 June 2010.

For copies of past editions of Policy Matters click here.

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Introducing New Steering Committee members

The 73rd meeting of the IUCN Council appointed one new Theme Co-Chair and three Regional Vice-Chairs to the Commission . Since then, two Steering Committee members have stepped down from their positions due to work commitments, Li Bo (China) - Co-Chair of TGER,  and Maria Pacheco (Guatemala) - Co-Chair of SEAPRISE.  I wish to record my thanks  to Li Bo and Maria for their work on behalf of CEESP. They both remain as Commission members.

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Ton Boon von Ochssée (The Netherlands), Co-Chair, Theme on Environment, Conflict & Security

Ton Boon von Ochssée is currently Ambassador of the Netherlands to the State of Kuwait and the Kingdom of Bahrein. From 2003 to 2008 he served as Ambassador for Sustainable Development and Chair of the Inter Ministerial Task Force Johannesburg of the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Before that he was a member of the GEF Secretariat at the World Bank in Washington, coordinating efforts with the Implementing Agencies, UNDP, UNEP and the World Bank to strengthen member country involvement in the GEF. He prepared policy conclusions for the GEF Council and conducted consultations with the Implementing Agencies in the formulation of strategies, business plans and action plans. In the period 2000-2002...

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Ali Darwish (Lebanon)

Ali Darwish, Regional Vice-Chair West Asia, is the president of Greenline Association in Lebanon. He was a Chief Technical Advisor in Agriculture for the German Technical Cooperation Agency since May 2005.

He worked as Project Manager for the National Action Programme to Combat Desertification (for the implementation of UNCCD), UNDP/Ministry of Agriculture and as a Free Lance Consultant-Agriculture, Environment and Development.

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Vivienne Solis Rivera (Costa Rica)

Vivienne Solís  (Costa Rica), Regional Vice Chair Meso America   is a biologist graduated from the University of Costa Rica (1983), with a Master Degree in Systematic and Ecology from the University of Lawrence, Kansas (1986). 

She has participated in interdisciplinary and inter-institutional projects of environmental education and training in the field of conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity.  Her professional activities in the last two decades have been oriented towards...

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Masego Madzwamuse (Botswana)

Masego Madzwamuse,  Regional Vice Chair for Southern Africa has extensive experience in traditional/indigenous natural resource management systems, community based conservation, land tenure and security, adaptive livelihood strategies, gender and environment, and sustainable land management.

She was IUCN Botswana Country Programme Coordinator from 2001 until February 2007 when she moved to IUCN ROSA as Regional Programme Development Officer where she stayed from March 2007 until May 2008. She then joined UNDP (June 2008-June 2009)...

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CEESP Steering Commitee Meeting

The CEESP Steering Committee met in Bangkok, Thailand November 27th and 28th 2009 immediately following the 73rd IUCN Council meeting. Eighteen Theme Co-Chairs, Regional Vice Chairs and CEESP Officers attended the meeting together with Secretariat and IUCN-ROSA staff.

Click below for the following:

Report of CEESP Chair to Steering Committe

CEESP SC Meeting Agenda, November 2009

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SSC – CEESP Workshop on Sustainable Use and Human Wildlife Interactions, UNEP-WCMC, Cambridge, 1-2 October 2009

Following the adoption of Resolution 4.039 (Cross Commission Collaboration on Sustainable Use of Biological Resources), and the subsequent survey and associated report on sustainable use and human-wildlife interactions (prepared by Holly Dublin and Carol Poole), this workshop was organised to chart the way forward for work on sustainable use and human-wildlife interactions...

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GENERAL NEWS & UPDATES

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Geo-Tagging Reveals Mining Threats on Philippine's “Last Ecological Frontier”

A field update from the ALDAW Network (Ancestral Land/Domain Watch)

Between July and September 2009, a mission organized by the Philippines-based Ancestral Land/Domain Watch (ALDAW) and the Centre for Biocultural Diversity (CBCD) at the University of Kent traveled to Southern Palawan in the Philippines. The mission was led by Dr. Dario Novellino (CBCD researcher and CEESP member). Palawan is part of the “Man and Biosphere Reserve” program of UNESCO and hosts 49 animals and 56 botanical species found in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

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‘Avatar is real', say tribal people

Survival International: 25 January 2010 - Following the film, Avatar's win at the Golden Globes, tribal people have claimed that the film tells the real story of their lives today.

Following the film, Avatar's win at the Golden Globes, tribal people have claimed that the film tells the real story of their lives today.

A Penan man from Sarawak, in the Malaysian part of Borneo, told Survival, 'The Penan people cannot live without the rainforest. The forest looks after us, and we look after it. We understand the plants and the animals because we have lived here for many, many years, since the time of our ancestors'.

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State of the World's Indigenous Peoples

Indigenous peoples contribute extensibly to humanity's cultural diversity, enriching it withmore than two thirds of its languages and an extraordinary amount of its traditional knowledge.

There are over 370 million indigenous people in some 90 countries, living in all regions of the world. The situation of indigenous peoples in many parts of the world is critical today. Poverty rates are significantly higher among indigenous peoples compared to other groups. While they constitute 5 per cent of the world's population, they are 15 per cent of the world's poor.

Most indicators of well-being show that indigenous peoples suffer disproportinately compared to non-indigenous peoples. Indigenous peoples face systemic discrimination and exclusion from political and economic power; they continue to be over-represented among the poorest, the illiterate, the destitute; they are displaced by wars and environmental disasters; indigenous peoples are dispossessed of their ancestral lands and deprived of their resources for survival, both physical and cultural; they are even robbed of their very right to life.

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Economic Value of Natural Capital and Green Development Mechanism

Biodiversity continues to be lost; funding continue s to be inadequate. Can carbon markets provide insights for increasing biodiversity finance? During the 1st week of December 2009, the Green Development Mechanism 2010 Initiative kicked off international multi-stakeholder consultations about the possibility of setting up a 'green development mechanism' under the Convention on Biological Diversity - essentially a 'CDM' for biodiversity.

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Biocultural Diversity Toolkit

Since 1996 Terralingua, an international NGO and IUCN member, has been at the forefront of developing research and applications in the field of biocultural diversity. This field conceives of the diversity of life as diversity in nature and culture. It has brought to the fore the links and interdependence between language, knowledge and the environment at the local level, and between biodiversity, cultural diversity and linguistic diversity globally.

Terralingua has worked tirelessly to promote the understanding and adoption of a biocultural perspective in academic, professional, and policy circles and among the general public, for the sake of human futures and the sustainability of all life on Earth.

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Climate change and agrobiodiversity: Strengthening adaptability and resilience, facilitating adaptation and transition

Agrobiodiversity is already proving to be important in helping rural communities and farmers throughout the world adapt to climate change. Diversity (genetic, species and ecosystem) in production systems can improve adaptability and resilience and is an essential part of adaptation to changing production conditions.

The Platform for Agrobiodiversity Research (PAR) is compiling information on the experiences of indigenous peoples and rural communities who are using agrobiodiversity to adapt to changing conditions and provide improved livelihood strategies.

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Progress towards Conservation of Wild Arabica Coffee in Ethiopia

The remnant forests of Ethiopia are important hotspots for biodiversity conservation. The most popular coffee species (Coffea arabica) originates from the a fromontane rainforests in the country. These forest ecosystems which harbor the only wild gene pools of this globally important crop plant are highly fragmented due to agricultural expansion and over exploitation.

A multi-disciplinary research project conducted from 2002 to 2009 by Ethiopian and German scientists (www.coffee.uni-bonn.de) revealed that the forest ecosystems with wild coffee plants, often called coffee forest, are very rich in plant species.

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IUCN NEWS & UPDATES

Recent activity of the IUCN Private Sector Task Force

Background: The current IUCN Council has set up the Private Sector Task Force “ to learn from and continue to improve on IUCN's engagement with the private sector, and to propose revisions to the Guidelines as appropriate”.

Immediately prior to the November 09 IUCN Council meeting a workshop was held for members of the Task Force and other interested members of Council. Then a report was presented to and discussed by the CEESP Executive Committee meeting in Bangkok 27-28 November 2009.

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73rd meeting of IUCN Council

An Overview of 73rd Council (23-25 November 2009) with a summary of the main discussion and decision points is available in English, French and Spanish on the IUCN Members Portal.

The Overview was also announced to IUCN Members in the ‘ Union Pulse ' last December.

You may also find there Council's decisions (with annexes in a separate file). IUCN Members have been notified via email.

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Establishment of the Pacific Resource and Environmental Economics Network (PREEN)

The use of resource and environmental economic analytical information to support and or underpin economic development and environmental conservation decisions is relatively new in the Pacific. Resource management has conventionally either not involved consideration of economic factors at all or has involved it only inadequately.

Similarly environmental conservation decisions often did not include livelihood or opportunity cost considerations. The failure of some environmental or natural resource management initiatives has consequently been attributed to the poor policy or project design arising from that economics gap.

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The 2012 IUCN World Conservation Congress will be held in Jeju, in the Republic of Korea, the IUCN Council decided in its 73rd regular meeting  

The IUCN World Conservation Congress is the world’s largest and most important conservation event.

Held every four years, it brings together top professionals from all regions to share knowledge on how our natural environment should be managed for the continued wellbeing of humanity and all life on Earth.

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UPCOMING 2010 EVENTS

2010 Events



May 9-14: 12th International Congress of Ethnobiology, Tofino, B.C. Canada

The overarching theme of the 12th ICE is Hishuk-ish tsa’walk, a Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations phrase that embodies the concept of “everything is one,” the understanding that everything is connected and nothing is isolated from other aspects of life surrounding it and within it.

The sub-themes include:

1) Conserved and protected areas and people

2) Cultural transmission of knowledge in protecting and restoring biocultural diversity

3) Traditional foods and food sovereignty

4) Other topics

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August 4-6 Hawai’I Conservation Congress,Hawai‘i Convention Center, Honolulu, Hawaii 

Ecosystem management and restoration in Hawai‘i and across the Pacific continues to evolve.

Over the past decade landowners, communities, agencies, and governments have begun to work together more collaboratively, utilizing diverse knowledge systems and decision-making approaches. The 2010 HCC will highlight success stories from Hawai‘i, New Zealand, Micronesia, and other Pacific Islands.

Join us in an exploration of this emerging trend in ecosystem management and restoration through formal presentations, informal discussions, and other opportunities to talk story with scientists and citizens, cultural practitioners and researchers. For further information click here.

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August 22-26 11th Conference of the International Society for Ecological Economics (ISEE) – Advancing Sustainability in a Time of Crisis:   

Conference Themes include:

  • Climate Change - causes, impacts, mitigation, adaptation, and policy options

  • Energy – renewable energy, energy flows, peak oil, green stimulus policies, energy and entropy, alternative energy and energy distribution technology

  • Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services – valuation issues and policy integration

  • Land Use – including coastal zone management, water issues, ecosystem restoration, bioregionalism

  • Ecology – complex systems, economy-ecology modelling, theoretical ecology

  • Dematerialization and De-Growth – industrial ecology, eco-efficiency, sustainable consumption and production

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October 18-29 Convention on Biological Diversity, Nagoya, Japan.

The CBD COP10 meeting being held in Nagoya , Japan will be very significant for a wide range of CEESP interests. It will be important for the Commission to have a strong presence. If you are intending to register for the CBD COP10 please contact ceesp@iucn.org as soon as your plans are confirmed so you can be included in any CEESP events.

2011 Events

Sharing Power: A New Development Paradigm, January, Whakatane, New Zealand

Resolution WCC4.078 requested the Director General, in cooperation with the Commission on Environmental, Economic and Social Policy (CEESP) and Agencies of the United Nations, to explore the possibilities of organizing a 'World Conference on Economics, Ecology, and the Environment' with the goal of advancing toward a unified vision of sustainability that will enable us to address current global environmental change. “

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PUBLICATIONS

Biocultural Diversity Conservation: A Global Sourcebook

Given the growing focus within CEESP and IUCN in general on the links between culture and conservation and between biodiversity and cultural diversity, CEESP members should be interested in the forthcoming book Biocultural Diversity Conservation: A Global Sourcebook , by Luisa Maffi and Ellen Woodley (to be published by Earthscan in February 2010, with IUCN sponsorship).

This book is a unique compendium and analysis of projects from all over the world that take an integrated biocultural approach to sustaining cultures and biodiversity.

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The End of the Hinterland: Forests, Conflict and Climate Change

n light of the recently completed UNFCCC COP15 in Copenhagen, the Rights and Resources Initiative (RRI) is pleased to release a new strategic analysis on the status of forest tenure, rights and resources globally – and the issues that affected them - in 2009.

The End of the Hinterland: Forests, Conflict and Climate Change was designed to both review the status and issues of 2009 and also preview what to watch for in 2010.A few of the challenges and successes that involved Indigenous communities in 2009 are covered in the report (including the "Treelords deal" in NZ).

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Making the Declaration Work

In addition to the UN report which was recently released by the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, the book announced below has just been released by IWGIA, edited by Claire Charters and Rodolfo Stavenhagen, available for purchase at 20 euros, or you can download the book at the link below at no charge.

The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is a culmination of a centuries-long struggle by indigenous peoples for justice. It is an important new addition to UN human rights instruments in that it promotes equality for the world's indigenous peoples and recognizes their collective rights.

The Declaration is the fruition of the work of scores of individuals over more than 25 years of protracted and intense negotiations.

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New policy brief from IIED: "Towards Food Sovereignty"

Executive summary: Localised food systems provide the foundations of people's nutrition, incomes, economies, ecologies and culture throughout the world. In this way food is primarily sold, processed, resold and consumed locally, with many people deriving their incomes and livelihoods through work and activities at different points of the food chain, from seed to plate. These local food systems provide a livelihood for more than 2.5 billion small-scale farmers, pastoralists, forest dwellers and artisanal fisherfolk worldwide.

However, despite their current role in and future potential for meeting human needs and sustaining diverse ecologies, local food systems-and the organisations that govern them- are threatened by two main processes. The first is the global restructuring of agri-food systems, with a few transnational corporations gaining monopoly control over different links in the food chain.

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Natural Solutions: Protected areas helping people cope with climate change

Natural Solutions: Protected areas helping people cope with climate change, from IUCN-WCPA, The Nature Conservancy, UNDP, Wildlife Conservation Society, The World Bank and WWF. A new report outlines the ways in which protected areas can help mitigate and adapt to climate change. Protected areas can contribute to the two main responses to climate change through:

Mitigation:

Storage of carbon : preventing the loss of carbon that is already present in vegetation and soils

Capture of carbon dioxide : sequestering further CO 2 from the atmosphere in natural ecosystems

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Lines in the Sands: Oil Sands Sector Benchmarking

Alberta's oil sands place the province second only to Saudi Arabia in the account of global oil reserves, and almost every major Canadian and international oil company plans to be involved in the development of the resource.

But the oil sands have become a focus of global criticism because of the industry's heavy environmental and social impacts - impacts that can generate a complex of litigious, regulatory, policy and social license risks to company value. Investors can manage risk and contribute to corporate change by engaging the companies they own, but to do so effectively, they need to understand the sector risks, and how they apply to specific companies.

This report presents key findings from oil sands sector benchmarking research conducted by the Sustainability Department at Northwest & Ethical Investments L.P., with support from the National Union of Public and General Employees and Ceres.

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Sustainable Development Knowledge Partnership launches Sustainable Development Insights

A new series of policy briefs called Sustainable Development Insights has been launched by the Sustainable Development Knowledge Partnership in collaboration with the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future.

CEESP is one of the partners in this UN initiated public-private knowledge partnership on sustainable development. This new series of publications will be edited by Prof. Adil Najam, Director of the Pardee Center, and managed and hosted by the Pardee Center as a contribution to the SDKP.

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Ethics of Waste in the Information Society

Guest Editors: Matthias Feilhauer & Soenke Zehle (CEESP Member) With this issue, IRIE - dedicated to the development of information ethics as a reflexive practice and conceptual horizon - aims to engage itself with the broad range of materials involved in the very acts and processes of communication, information, and knowledge production.

This includes, but is not limited to, the instruments we employ, use, and discard in ever-shorter cycles of consumption, outpacing our efforts to develop appropriate mechanisms of disposal and recycling: from old television sets to LCD and plasma displays, from old disk drives to flash cards and RFID chips.

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Planning for Sustainability in Kathmandu, Nepal: Developing Indicators and Implementing Policies

Abstract: Sustainability is now considered a key objective of urban planning everywhere. However, due to inappropriate planning, weak institutions, lack of resources and poor implementation of policies, most big cities in the developing world have become even less sustainable than they were in the past.

Kathmandu, Nepal enjoyed a unique tradition, rich history and a moderate state of sustainability in the past. However, the rapidly growing and modernizing city of Kathmandu is facing serious problems of sustainability in all fronts: economic, environmental and ecological. Whereas environmental and economic sustainability was tacitly imbedded in the traditional planning practices in Nepal , the rapid expansion and modernization of all the major cities in the Kathmandu valley is making them increasingly unsustainable.

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Economic Costs of the 2009 Floods in the Fiji Sugar Belt and Policy Implications

Based on an economic assessment of the January 2009 floods using detailed GIS based flood inundation assessment and household field survey data, Lal, Rita and Khatri estimate the cost of the January 2009 floods to the sugar industry to be FJ $24 million.

In addition, there was also an estimated humanitarian cost of FJ $5 million. Such costs could have been reduced, the report argues, had attention been given to the maintenance of some of natural ecosystem services, particularly by maintaining farm drains and drainage systems in the mangrove reclaimed land and on hilly lands. Other issues analyzed include poverty implication of the floods on the flood affected sugarcane farmers, the effect of government's macroeconomic policy and the state industry health.

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Relationship between Natural Disasters and Poverty: a Fiji Case Study

A technical report, prepared by Padma Narsey Lal of IUCN ORO and Reshika Singh and Paula Holland of SOPAC, confirms a two way relationship between disaster and poverty in Fiji . The report is based on a detailed econometric analysis of time series empirical data from Fiji on disaster outcomes and poverty and human development indicators, as well as other development parameters and other external shocks such as coups.

This Fiji case study provides an understanding of the relationship between disasters and poverty in selected Asia Pacific regions. It offers a study method for the use of other Pacific Island countries and territories in their disaster risk management. The study also provides specific multi-pronged policy recommendations for decreasing disaster risk and increasing resilience.

Review of Economic and Livelihood Impact Assessments of, and Adaptation to, Climate Change in Melanesia

A secondary literature based review report prepared by Padma Narsey Lal of IUCN ORO and Jeff Kinch and Frank Wickham of SPREP provides an assessment of the economic costs of climate change, climate variability and sea level rise in the Pacific, including Melanesia.

It also identifies gaps in knowledge about economic cost of climate change; gaps in baseline information and the capacity development needs for strengthening resilience to climate change.

Fodder for War: Getting to the Crux of the Natural Resources Crisis

Let me begin with a polemic to get my main point across as to the connection between inequitable land rights and conflict. Let me put it this way: what is the best way to start a civil conflict today?

Well, one way is territorial invasion and respondent resistance. This has a pretty solid history – and is still seen in some of the older conflicts grinding on today (the Basque and Kurdish conflicts, Israel/ Palestine) but we are seeing this less and less - with one or two painful recent exceptions (Chechnya, Ossetia, Iraq).

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